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Glue Chipped Glass Issues

Hand Lettering topics: Sign Making, Design, Fabrication, Letterheads, Sign Books.

Moderators: Ron Percell, Mike Jackson, Danny Baronian

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Ron Percell
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Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 9:32 am
Location: Angie, La.
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Glue Chipped Glass Issues

Post by Ron Percell »

Glue Chipped Glass Issues
Glue Chipped Glass heads up, looking to get input on glue chipping problems folks have been having recently.

Over the last couple of weeks I've helping an unusual amount of folks with their glue chip techniques, many have failed using techniques they perfected over 30-40 years. This year we sold 3 times the average amount ours is always fresh and stored in very dry rooms.

Many folks that call have bought through others sources, but we still help tech over the phone.

One of the bigger changes some may have not known about is the change in the Sun's activity. This is known as the Grand Solar Minimum, in which the activity or frequency of solar flairs and Sun spot has reduced. Bear with me please, as a result the Jet Stream has changed it's location and lower down closer to the Equator.

Those in America have seen weather patterns change, as a coarse example 2 weeks sunny, 2 weeks raining. This has also lead to strange growing seasons for farmers.

My first suggestion is that you monitor your humidity, I prefer 20-30 percent humidity in a closed environment made of very dry wood to help adsorb moisture.

Avoid glue older than 4 years. when Rick Glawson passed, I would get his customers calling about glue failures and found a common answer was that they had purchased it around 5 years past.

Sand can also be a source of oil contamination, so clean with 2 tablespoons of dry Lye per gallon of water, let set 10 minutes after shaking mixture. Then pour across surface to be chipped and let stand for 2 or more minutes. This is also a good method for cleaning out the Asphaltum Varnish or trapped dirt areas in the shards of chips.

Rumor has it that modern glass may have changed, some have suggested getting older used glass, not sure on that yet, but I'm sure glass is being made offshore now days.

Distilled water may assist if your issues are water contamination affecting the glue.

I look forward to your contributions
Good Luck
Craig Leslie
Posts: 10
Joined: Mon Jan 02, 2017 7:00 pm

Re: Glue Chipped Glass Issues

Post by Craig Leslie »

Hi Ron ...i also have had problems lately with getting the glue to chip...i first started glue chipping a couple of years ago so i am by no means a master of the craft...when i first started i had a lot of failures but after getting some great advice from pat mackle and others on this forum i started having some real success with it..i then came across an article that pat mackle wrote in sandcarver magazine...following those instructions which included a recommended grit size, recycling the used glue, letting it dry slowly and so forth i started to get some pretty consistent chip patterns but in the past few weeks i have had mixed results...first up i chipped some glass that had been in my workshop for the last couple of years and the recycled glue was about that old as well..no problems...then i tried to chip some glass that i had only just bought and the glue basically just peeled off with a maybe 95% of the glass remaining unchipped...my procedure has not changed at all... i blast with 80 grit aluminum oxide then apply the glue and let it dry slowly and naturally until it is rock hard and then put it into an old wardrobe with a thermostatically controlled heater set to around 100 to 110 degrees fahrenheit...humidity gets down to as low as 20% and from everything i have read on the subject you would think that the conditions would be ideal for chipping...as i said i am no expert but my suspicion is that the new glass is somehow different...you mentioned issues in the U.S with weather patterns but i live on the other side of the world in a little island state at the southern end of Australia...we have high humidity all year round and are presently coming to the end of our winter but this is the first time i have had the glue just peel off the glass
Ron Percell
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Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 9:32 am
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Re: Glue Chipped Glass Issues

Post by Ron Percell »

Kristi Percell researched Glue and Glass Manufacturing for us this morning.

Good News on the Glue, manufactures say they have not changed and has a long life. They also pointed out the same info on the changing weather.

Bill and Sharon Empy of "Emps Graphic Eye", 40 years of chipping, in business since 1986 just barely finished a panel to chip after 5 attempts they produced a minimum amount of chip to get by and they asked how did you know.

There has definitely been changes to Glass manufacturing, evident in articles found. The Ovens are being changed out to be more energy compliant. Glass making ingredients are being "improved " to be stronger and more efficient as early as 2017.


Antimicrobial Coatings

These Ideas are confirmed in the following article by the "The Architect's Newspaper" that discusses how current illness is changing how the future of glass is changing with Vitro Architectural Glass’s Fresno plant, makers of Starphire(TM)
That’s when the versatility of glass is so key because it’s easy to clean, you can add Antimicrobial Coatings, and there’s natural light.
https://www.archpaper.com/2020/06/post- ... -response/

Articles on Glass Manufacturing:

120 YEARS IN GLASS by KATY DEVLIN of Glass Magazine
https://www.glassmagazine.com/article/120-years-glass

Advancing float glass
https://www.glassmagazine.com/article/f ... chnologies

Transforming float glass
https://www.glassmagazine.com/article/world-glass

Changes
https://www.glassmagazine.com/blog/2020 ... ady-change

industry report on glass
https://www.glassmagazine.com/article/s ... 020-report

This article discusses how Guardian Glass facility operates:
https://www.guardianglass.com/us/en
Terry Westlin
Posts: 41
Joined: Fri Jan 01, 2010 9:28 pm

Re: Glue Chipped Glass Issues

Post by Terry Westlin »

Thank you very much for the information and continued great advice.

Wish I had more time to put it to use.

Thank you all
Terry
Kevin Betz
Posts: 1
Joined: Sun Jul 04, 2004 4:54 pm

Re: Glue Chipped Glass Issues

Post by Kevin Betz »

I am curious about recycling Old Glue.
\What is the difference between using New Glue vs recycling the used glue ?
Also, is the ratio still the same: 1 to 1 for Fine Chip up to 3 to 1 for
Heavier Chip ?

Kevin
Ron Percell
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Joined: Fri Apr 09, 2004 9:32 am
Location: Angie, La.
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Re: Glue Chipped Glass Issues

Post by Ron Percell »

Minimal difference if cured dry for future use.

Your ratio in the question is reversed and is also a open ended question. Either mix will work, both end up drying... More water ratio may require Dams to keep an 1/8" thickness, Less water ratio may be too thick when poured and left to gravity and must be spread to an 1/8" thickness.

I only suggest Recycling glue that has chipped glass and is fully dry, not any of the glue that is left behind on unchipped areas. This practice works best on large projects when glue application and chipping at the same time, otherwise fresh glue is inexpensive compared to going through the process twice.

CAUTION!!! Recycled glue has glass shards (broken glass) imbedded within, these shards will drop to the bottom after the glue is re-warmed.

Recycling glue in a Refrigerator seldom works, and if any mold occurs dispose of immediately.

Water ratio does not change. Less water in glue decreases cure/chip time. The ratios are to achieve a glue that when poured averages 1/8" thick.

Reduction of water produces a thicker glue, 1/4" thickness that will take longer to cure and can be perforated say with a spiked roller to add areas that can breath and assist curing. 1/4" thick glue may break your glass if glass is to thin, or create large ice berg effects over the desired Fern chip. You may choose to produce thick glue but spread it thin. Glass thickness also plays a role, most of this formula discussion is based on 3/16" or 1/4" plate glass, where as 1/2" or 1" you may choose to experiment for deeper chips.

Making sample pieces on different thicknesses of glass and of the glue will expand your understanding how Hide Glue works technically.
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